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Daylight Saving in Morocco 2012

Daylight Saving in Morocco 2012
Once again Morocco will have an unusual daylight saving schedule. The problem has always been that some people have objected to having the time change during Ramadan.  Critics say this makes no logical sense, but is at a religious sensibility.

There will be a lot of time changing in Morocco this year
With Ramadan moving earlier each year, it is an ongoing problem and this year a new solution has been found. Morocco will set its clocks one hour ahead from the end of April to the end of September - except during the holy month of Ramadan. Daylight saving will resume after Ramadan. This has been decided by the Government’s Council.



The history of daylight saving has been a mixed one that started in 2008. Morocco decided to trial daylight saving time when it moved the clock one hour forward (UTC+1) at midnight between May 31 and June 1 . The daylight saving schedule was supposed to end September 28th that year. However, the many individuals and business groups were surprised when a decision was suddenly made to end the daylight saving date nearly a month ahead of schedule. The decision also played havoc with international airline schedules. (See our 2008 story here) Hopefully this year will see the time changes running smoothly, though how airline schedules will deal with the on-again then off-again for Ramadan  (probable dates are July 21 to August 19 ) and then on-again... is anyone's guess. A draft decree, adopted by the Government’s Council stipulates that the standard time will be resumed at 3 am on the last Sunday in September,. Speaking in this regard, Minister in charge of Civil Service and the Administration Modernisation said that that daylight saving changes will boost Morocco’s economic competitiveness through reducing energy consumption and facilitating transactions with foreign partners. This timing, he said, would enable Morocco to save 140 megawatts at peak time, which in turn will have a positive impact on the environment and on the investments of Morocco’s electricity utilities. SHARE THIS!
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Housing the Poor - the impact on Moroccan Property
Morocco’s housing deficit stood at roughly 608,000 units in 2011, with a significant shortfall in terms of the availability of government-sponsored accommodation, exacerbated in part by the Kingdom’s move to eliminate shantytowns and shift residents into proper housing.


Moving families out of the slums is a priority


The VSB programme has been most successful so far in the Oriental Region, located in north-eastern Morocco, where 83% of the targeted households have been demolished and families relocated. The Al Omrane-Oujda group, a real estate company placed under the supervision of the Ministry of Housing, has been one of the main players in the region in helping eradicate slums.

 Also among the company’s main projects is that of the urban zone planned for the town of Al Aroui where 210 ha will be dedicated to housing. Some 36,000 housing units will be built in the area for about 180,000 inhabitants. Relocating families into the refurbished apartments planned by the government has been made possible thanks to a number of financing mechanisms. Fogarim, which has provided government-backed mortgages to people with low incomes since 2003, has enabled 81,000 people to obtain their own home. 


Among these, 15,200 households that have been relocated under the VSB scheme have benefitted from the Fogarim scheme. At the end of 2011, the credit distributed to these families accounted for around 11%, or Dh1.22bn (€109.3m), of total issued Fogarim credit.


  However, the Fogarim programme currently faces a major challenge as a number of payment defaults have been reported in towns such as Oujda, Azrou and Rabat, where some households have failed to pay off their monthly instalments of around Dh1500 (€134). Authorities have asked banks for more time before taking judicial action again the loanholders, and the Ministry of Economy and Finance has put in place a new loan, the Fogarim-VSB, that specifically targets this segment of the population and lowers their monthly payments to Dh1000 (€90).

  Morocco’s residential sector will continue to expand as the government pursues its objective of relocating people to newer, urban housing. Already some 4000 ha of land per year have been reclaimed for urban projects, with some 45% of this used for real estate, according to the Ministry of Agriculture. With the government planning to develop a further 70,000 ha, the sheer volume and scale of the government’s housing schemes should leave plenty of room for growth in real estate. 

  As evidenced by an increased demand for construction materials, including a dramatic 25% rise in cement sales, Morocco’s property sector is continuing to see steady growth thanks in large part to a strong emphasis on social housing – a segment that has consistently run a deficit of supply, thereby promising continued expansion in the years to come, Global Arab Network reports.

  Residential property remains the real estate sector’s main driving force, accounting for around 67% of total sales. In 2011, prices increased by 3.4% compared to 2010 and the number of units sold on the market was up by 13.6%. According to the latest statistics released by Bank Al Maghrib for the last quarter of 2011, the volume of transactions in the residential property sector rose by 22.8%, mainly due to the increase in middle-income and high-end apartment and villa sales. In the last quarter of 2011, villa prices saw a year-on-year (y-o-y) increase of 4.2% and sales rose by 11.3%.

  However, it was apartment sales that lead the sector, accounting for around 61% of total sales. Prices saw a y-o-y increase of 5.2%, while the volume of transactions rose by 25.7%. The majority of real estate activity comes from further along the socioeconomic spectrum, at the affordable housing end, which accounts for more than two-thirds of total residential demand.

Our work in Morocco


Our work in Morocco

The British Embassy in Rabat has for many years supported Morocco's ongoing process of democratisation, modernisation and improvements in good governance and human rights. This commitment is constantly being strengthened in partnership with Moroccan government and civil society by setting up programmes covering a wide range of areas that will together provide firm foundations for future reform and development.

Each of the projects makes use of British expertise in close co-operation with local and international experts. Moroccan partners play an important role, providing leadership, advice and often joint financing. The projects have established British co-operation with many sectors of Moroccan society including judges, lawyers, journalists, academics, civil servants, civil society activists, environmentalists and rural populations.

Most Romantic Beaches of Morocco

Most Romantic Beaches of Morocco






Most Romantic Beaches of the Med


© Acqualina Resort & Spa
Sunny Isles Beach vs. South Beach

When it comes to naming 10 so-called "hot alternative beaches," Sunny Isles Beach immediately comes to mind, thanks in good part to the opening of the Acqualina Resort in 2006. There's also a new Le Meridian and the Trump International Beach Resort. Located on a barrier island just 13 miles north of Miami Beach, it's also just three miles away from Bal Harbour's renowned shopping. Stacy Small, president of Elite Travel International, a boutique luxury travel agency in Brentwood, Calif., calls the Sunny Isles accommodations "more sophisticated" than those of its more celebrated neighbor.



© Anguilla Tourist Board
Tarifa vs. Essaouira

Essaouira, one of the best of Morocco's beaches, tends to be uncomfortably crowded, especially in the popular summer months. But in Tarifa, Spain, roughly ten miles from the African shore, it's a completely different story. "It's at the southernmost point of Europe, where the Mediterranean and Atlantic meet, and a perfect alternative to Morocco for those who truly want to chill out in a local beach town," says Stacy Small, president of Elite Travel International.


© Anguilla Tourist Board
Anguilla vs. St. Barths

As St. Barths becomes increasingly overrun, true trendsetters are island-hopping over to Anguilla, just a few miles to the north. The island's rocky terrain is ringed by white sand beaches, which are in turn regularly visited by such stars as Jennifer Aniston and Brad Pitt (pre-Brangelina) and Beyonce. Celebs love the low-key vibe, which provides a welcome respite from the over-the-top hedonism of St. Barths.




© Robert Harding Picture Library Ltd / Alamy
Tamarama Beach vs. Bondi Beach

Located just one kilometer from Australia's world famous Bondi Beach, Tamarama has been nicknamed "Glamarama Beach" by those familiar with its daily parade of perfectly chiseled bodies. Most accommodations and nightlife remain in Bondi, but Tamarama has annexed the see-and-be-seen daytime scene. A lovely path connects the two beaches.





© Hawaii Tourism Japan (HTJ)
Lanai vs. Waikiki

"Waikiki is lined with hotels and is always busy and crowded, although still beautiful," says Stacy Small, president of Elite Travel International. "In contrast, Lanai—just a short flight away—has few resorts." Just two, in fact, and only one of them, the Four Seasons Resort Lanai at Manele Bay, sits on the ocean. Just a half hour by plane from Honolulu (on the island of Oahu, where Waikiki is also located), Lanai overwhelms visitors with its spectacular landscape and solitude (the island has fewer than 3,000 permanent residents).





© Paraiso de la Bonita Resort
The Riviera Maya vs. Cancun

Cancun attracts literally millions of visitors per year, and is barely clinging to its reputation as an oceanfront hotspot. This is at least in part because the true trendsetters have decamped to the nearby Riviera Maya, a tropical stretch of coast where several new luxury resorts—spearheaded by the Paraiso de la Bonita—help make it, as Small says, "the real star in this region." It is also conveniently located just a 30-minute drive from Cancun's high-traffic international airport.




© Art Kowalsky / Alamy
Eze-sur-Mer vs. Nice

Nice has long been the point of entry to the Cote d'Azu. But nearby Eze-sur-Mer has less crowded beaches, a beautiful and historic cliff-top town with amazing views of the Mediterranean, as well as its own charming hotels and restaurants. And it's only five miles from Nice's abundant shopping and nightlife.




© iStockphoto.com/Sheldon Kralstein
Biarritz vs. San Sebastian

While San Sebastian is a common stop on Americans' European itineraries, Biarritz, just a few miles north across the border with France, has largely escaped their attention. According to Small, "This luxurious seaside town boasts some of the best beaches in Europe." Historically, Biarritz was a destination for European royalty—Empress Eugenie built a seaside palace there in 1854. Today, chic vacationers can do the same—her summer home is now the Hotel du Palais.




© AA World Travel Library / Alamy
Jamestown vs. Newport

Newport is America's seminal exclusive beachside resort, having hosted the country's rich and elite since the mid-19th century. But there's another historic town in the area that lately is giving the grand dame a run for her old money: Jamestown. While most visitors rush to Newport in the summer, Jamestown still offers a charming New England small-town feel. And trendsetters have taken notice, as many would-be Newporters have taken advantage of Jamestown's cheaper (for now) real estate.



© WoodyStock / Alamy
Jose Ignacio vs. Punta Del Este

Anyone who's anyone in Argentina and other South American countries spends a chunk of their summers in "Punta"—but they rarely complete a season without some time spent in Jose Ignacio, as well. According to Small, the spot 25 miles north of Punta "retains its original fishing village charm while slowly evolving into a celebrity enclave of its own." Most visitors rent villas, as there are limited options for hotel rooms. But that should all change when the scheduled Setai resort with residences opens.





© Paraiso de la Bonita Resort
The Riviera Maya vs. Cancun

Cancun attracts literally millions of visitors per year, and is barely clinging to its reputation as an oceanfront hotspot. This is at least in part because the true trendsetters have decamped to the nearby Riviera Maya, a tropical stretch of coast where several new luxury resorts—spearheaded by the Paraiso de la Bonita—help make it, as Small says, "the real star in this region." It is also conveniently located just a 30-minute drive from Cancun's high-traffic international airport.

Mediterrania-Saidia -Moroccan beaches


Whether you're a fan of windsurfing, kite, surfing, wake boarding or jet skiing, sure, you will find waves there waiting for you.

On the most indented coast of the Mediterranean, between Tangier and Al Hoceima, the sea is calm and quiet, the beaches are more intimate.

Some are close to small traditional fishing villages, nestling in the corner of natural paradise.

In parallel, new resorts are emerging as Tamuda Bay on the outskirts of Tetouan and Saidia, a new resort on the Mediterranean coast.

Facing Andalusia, Mediterrania-Saidia covers over 700 acres with a waterfront of 6 km of white sand, a marina and golf 18 holes complete at a development site, near two international airports.


  Discover the beautiful sandybeaches and small sheltered bays and deserted often stretching along the Mediterranean coast.
You will be surprised by the earthly paradises hidden behind the majestic Rif mountain range.

Tamuda Bay Saidia will be an unforgettable stay. The Mediterranean coastline unfolds with its calm and crystal clear waters and fine white sand. The panorama is breathtaking.

Whether you are tempted by a boat trip to sailing, scuba diving (many hotels have their own centers), a romantic stroll along the shore or a simple and delicious tanning session in the sun if you are overwhelmed.

Moroccan beaches are for all tastes and desires.


Moroccan Beaches

Moroccan beaches are for all tastes and desires.

Bordered by the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean, Morocco has several thousands of kilometers of coastline where the scenery is varied and inviting.



The most popular Moroccan beaches are naturally located near cities, especially on the Atlantic coast.

But there are hundreds more in places where nature has remained intact.

All allow you to experience the joys of swimming, relaxing or popular water sports.

The vast majority of beaches are as long strips of sand facing the ocean waves. They will become hotter as you go south to the sublime bay of Dakhla.

The northeast trade wind is blowing steadily from late March to mid-September on the corner of the coast: ideal conditions for practicing all winter sports, including surfing.

Morocco Beaches for Every Taste


Morocco Beaches for Every Taste 

Bordered by the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean, Morocco has several thousand kilometers of coast whose landscapes are diverse and beaches welcoming.

Atlantic

The most visited beaches are naturally located not far from cities, especially on the Atlantic coast. But there are hundreds of others in places where nature has remained unspoilt. They all make it possible to sample the joys of swimming, relaxing and the latest water sports. On the Atlantic coast, the great majority of beaches appear as long strips of fine sand lapped by the ocean waves. They will be hotter the further south you go until you reach the sublime Dakhla Bay. The north-east trade wind blows regularly from the end of March to mid-September on this corner of the coast: ideal conditions for practicing all board sports, especially surfing. Whether you're a fan of windsurfing, kitesurfing, surfing, wakeboarding or jet skiing, you can sure you will find the right waves here.

Mediterranean

On the more divided up coast of the Mediterranean, between Tangier and Al Hoceima, the sea is warm and calm and the beaches more intimate. Some are close to small traditional fishing villages, tucked into corners of idyllic nature. At the same time, new seaside resorts are springing up such as Tamuda Bay, on the outskirts of T├ętouan and Saidia, which is a new Mediterranean coast resort. Facing Andalusia, Mediterrania-Saida extends over 1700 acres with a 6km seafront of white sand. A pleasure port and an 18-hole golf course complete this site which has been developed next to two international airports. The Atlantic is not sitting on its laurels either with new resorts such as Lixus, Mazagan, Taghazout and Plage Blanche.